louis

25 Jul 2016 117 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Masada 1
Masada 1|

Masada 1

 

A place of extraordinary history and an Israeli icon in modern times. The Snake Path in view here scales what is more or less the eastern (Dead Sea) side of Mount Masada. The climb is roughly 400 metres. There is a cable car alternative and on the western side, the climb is roughly 100 meters. This last option is seldom used.

 

The attraction is a fortress built by King Herod between 37 and 31 BC, on the flat lozenge shaped top, if ever the need should arise to escape the various enemies of the day. It included a casemate wall around the plateau, storehouses, large cisterns ingeniously filled with rainwater, barracks, palaces and an armory. The palace served as a winter palace. Herod and his successor kept the place stocked. Most of these buildings survived, albeit roofless, and makes for an interesting visit.

 

In my Wednesday post, I will provide some information about what happened here, during the first Jewish-Roman war 73 - 74 AD; also referred to as the Great Revolt by Hebrew speaking people. The war was the result of the Roman occupation of Israel and Judea. The Jews resented the additional taxes and a faction of militants called the Zealots was organised. One of the Zealot extremist groups, was the Sicarii - so named for the sicari dagger they used. They were quite good at killing Roman citizens and people siding with the Romans - e.g. tax collector. Some later Roman prefects raided the Jewish temple for valuables and tried to force Jews to pay homage to Roman gods. Well, the stage was set for a war.

 

Interesting to note that Matthew, a disciple of Jesus was first a toll gate operator in Caphernaum and was in fact collecting tax for the Romans. Another disciple was Simon the Zealot ...

 

Wiki provides some good background to the Jewish-Roman wars, if you are interested in reading up.

 

Oh yes, some of you are bound to ask me. A week before going to Israel, I picked up tendonitis of the heel. Although we walked and climbed more than a 100kms during our visit (two girls had their pedometers with them), I knew I would be courting disaster if I tried this particular ascent - so I took the cable car. Pity, I knew I would look pretty in a "I conquered Masada" T-shirt - but it would have been a false claim.

 

 

comments (15)

  • Ray
  • Not United States
  • 25 Jul 2016, 03:01
Someone has to ride the cable car, Louis, or it will be torn down.

Did you make this shot from your air-conditioned capsule as it rode majestically up the slope?
Louis: Thanks for the moral support, Ray. No, the shot was made from the bridge where we were waiting for said airco capsule to arrive.
Fascinating, Louis - and I like that you were forced to take the cable car- we wouldn't have seen this perspective!
Louis: Oh, I would have done a lot of shooting with the camera, even if it was only to catch my breath, Elizabeth.
  • Lisl
  • Bath, England
  • 25 Jul 2016, 06:08
Very much a place of pilgrimage with so many attempting the climb. I can still remember the first time I ever read about Masada - it will be with me for ever
Louis: It is a place that provides a perspective of the Israeli (non-Palestinian) population of Israel. I will get to that on Friday.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 25 Jul 2016, 06:41
It really does look to be a long trek to get up there Louis. Thanks again for the interesting history
Louis: 2 to 4 hours, depending on your fitness, Chris. I believe there will be those outstanding individuals that will do it at a canter, in much less time.
Quite an impressive sight of this mythical place Louis!
Did you use the cable car?
Louis: A week before going to Israel, I picked up tendonitis of the heel. Although we walked and climbed more than a 100kms during our visit (two girls had their pedometers with them), I knew I would be courting disaster if I tried this particular ascent - so I took the cable car. Pity, I knew I would look pretty in a "I conquered Masada" T-shirt - but it would have been a false claim.
That is some Zip Wire Louis.

More historical interest again. Now I know where the word Zealot came from too
Louis: Many Zip Lines available in SA. The other day, my wife and 2 sisters (one is 70) stepped into harness and did the zip at Oribi Gorge. The other sister has something about heights, but went down the zip - apparently it is "different".
  • Martine
  • France
  • 25 Jul 2016, 08:05
Les gens sont courageux de monter ce chemin.
Louis: Je suis d'accord. Ils sont courageux. Merci, Martine.
You might not have taken this wonderful image if you had not ridden on the car Louis. Tendinitis is never funny, I once had it in my elbow. I also try and resist paying taxes, but I have discovered that resistance is useless.
Louis: Oh, I would have done a lot of shooting with the camera, even if it was only to catch my breath, gutteridge. Don't pay the ferryman and don't mess with the taxman.
I absolutely love the photo, Louis and the story is excellent too.
Louis: Thank you Mary. Very little rain fell, but there are parts of the country that is snowed under or with black ice on the roads. This happened yesterday.
Very impressive, Louis, I do like shots like this, little figures in a huge landscape...
Louis: Beingh there was also quite an experience, Frank.
That looks a trek and a half to go up that track
Louis: 2 to 4 hours, depending on your fitness, Martin. I believe there will be those outstanding individuals that will do it at a canter, in much less time.
I think I'd have been happy to take the cable car!
Louis: If my heel was okay, I would have done the climb. I would have suffered, but it would have been something to say - that I have done it.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 26 Jul 2016, 11:05
I am learning every day, looks a gruelling climb though.

On the subject of T shirts. I remember making an exploratory visit to Saigon just after the country reopened. I was feeling very pleased with myself until I saw a girl in the departure lounge wearing a Phom Pen t shirt. Put my exploits into perspective as the Khmer Rouge were still very active.
Louis: Interesting anecdote, blackdog. The off-side of the story is that not many people would understand her t-shirt. Would be thinking it is something new, replacing Parker Pen. We have an expression: "Been there, done that, still have the bloody and torn t-shirt in the drawer!"
A fine shot, far too steep for me.
Louis: Thank you Brian - it is better to know your limits.
That's a long way up...

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera COOLPIX P500
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed 1/800s
aperture f/4.6
sensitivity ISO160
focal length 17.7mm
I see the seaI see the sea
Masada 2Masada 2
Wadi QumranWadi Qumran

Warning